Bragg, Colangelo to Testify in House One Day After Trump’s July 11 Sentencing Hearing

Alvin Bragg and Matthew Colangelo (composite image)

The jury found Trump guilty on all 34 counts of falsifying business records in the first degree for his reimbursement of a $130,000 payment his then-lawyer Michael Cohen made to porn star Stormy Daniels ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg and prosecutor Matthew Colangelo agreed to testify publicly before the House Judiciary Committee on July 12, which is one day after former President Trump’s sentencing hearing in the hush money case where he was found guilty

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Commentary: Trump’s Conviction Signals New Political Era

Donald Trump

When an elderly relative is dying and the inevitable finally arrives, it still hurts a great deal. From the beginning, I had no faith in the legal process that has convicted Donald Trump in New York. Taking into account the prosecutor, the charges, the venue, the biased judicial oversight, and the sui generis nature of the proceedings, it was pretty obvious the fix was in from the beginning. But his conviction is a depressing spectacle all the same. It felt like we woke up in a different country on Friday.

Until the news arrived, I had not completely lost hope. After all, it was a jury trial. Juries have previously defied both public opinion and threats of riots to do the right thing by defendants. In recent years, Kyle Rittenhouse was acquitted, as was George Zimmerman. Because of the unanimity requirement, there was always a chance that one or more of the jurors might hold out and create a mistrial, at the very least.

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As Trump’s Trial Sucks Up Air Time, Hunter Biden Could Be Hurtling Toward Multiple Felony Convictions

Hunter Biden in courtroom (composite image)

Just a few hours south of the Manhattan courthouse where Democratic District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s team is attempting to secure a guilty verdict in the first criminal trial of a former president, another high-profile trial is slated to begin this summer. That trial could also deliver a seismic verdict ahead of the 2024 election: a felony conviction for President Joe Biden’s son.

For weeks, the Manhattan courthouse has served as the de-facto center of Trump’s campaign as he dispatches daily remarks to press in the hallway ahead of entering the courtroom, where he is required to stay for the duration of the trial proceedings. While Trump’s trial has dominated headlines with salacious witness testimony, a gag order that prevents Trump from responding to political attacks by witnesses and an unclear central charge that has led many to criticize Bragg for bringing the case at all, Hunter Biden will face his own trial on felony gun charges next month.

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Disbarred Michael Cohen’s Testimony Did Little to Help Bragg’s Case, Credibility Still a Problem

Michael Cohen’s opening day of testimony—much like other witnesses—appeared to do little to bolster Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s case against former President Donald Trump, which at least one legal expert assesses is weak.

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Commentary: Shock and Awe on the Campaign Trail

Trump Biden

I would wager that a million or more words have been written about the trials and tribulations — but especially the trials — of Donald Trump. I have written quite a few myself, here at American Greatness and elsewhere.

Some stories from the left are of the gleefully salivating variety. “Goodie! The Bad Orange Man is Getting His and Might Even go to Jail.  Hallelujah!”

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New Manhattan District Attorney, Backed by Soros, Seeks to Reduce Criminal Sentences

The controversial new District Attorney for Manhattan, New York City has ordered his prosecutors to stop seeking harsh sentences against murderers and terrorists, including life sentences without the possibility of parole.

The Washington Free Beacon reports that District Attorney Alvin Bragg (D-N.Y.) issued a memo on January 3rd prohibiting his staff from pursuing sentences such as life in prison, and even went so far as to suggest that they never pursue sentences any harsher than 20 years behind bars.

“My commitment to making incarceration a matter of last resort is immutable,” Bragg said in the memo. “In exceptionally serious cases such as homicides where lengthy periods of incarceration are justified, ADAs shall consider the use of restorative justice as a mitigating factor in determining the length of the sentence, only when victims or their loved ones consent.”

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