Judge Denies Jen Psaki’s Attempt to Avoid Testifying About White House-Big Tech Collusion

A federal court denied former White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki’s request Monday to avoid deposition in a lawsuit alleging coordination between Biden administration authorities and social media companies to suppress free speech.

The lawsuit first filed by Republican Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt and Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry in May accuses President Joe Biden and administration parties, including the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), of colluding with or coercing the companies to “suppress disfavored speakers, viewpoints, and content” on their platforms with “dis-information,” “mis-information” and “mal-information” labels. Psaki filed a motion last week in a bid to avoid complying with the subpoena requiring her to testify, but Judge Terry Doughty of the Western District Court of Louisiana decided Monday to reject the motion and Psaki’s alternative request to stay her deposition.

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Commentary: For the Left, Politics Is a Full-Time Job

The midterm results were surprising. Dismal economic conditions and widespread public sentiment suggested a wave, and the Republicans did get more votes, but they barely won the House and failed to carry the Senate. There are reasons for all of this, including Democrat-friendly election procedures, but it is still very disappointing. 

Republicans like to think of politics as something you do every few years in the same manner as nominal Christians who go to church on Christmas and Easter. When it comes to politics, the Left are the fundamentalists. For them, it is full-time, dictating what needs to happen with everything and everyone, everywhere.

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Marsha Blackburn Commentary: Firing Servicemembers over the COVID-19 Shot Threatens Our National Security

President Biden said it himself: the pandemic is over. So why is his Department of Defense (DoD) willing to look at the brave men and women who volunteered to serve our nation and say, “you’re fired” – all because they chose not to get the COVID-19 shot?

In the United States, the number of new servicemembers joining the military has reached a record low. Every single branch struggled to hit its recruitment goals this year, including the U.S. Army, which fell 10,000 soldiers short. At this rate, they will face a deficit of 21,000 soldiers next year. The National Guard also missed the mark by about 12,000 recruits, and expects to discharge up to 14,000 more by 2024 for refusing the COVID-19 shot.

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New Englanders Will Pay 65 Percent More to Heat Their Homes This Winter

The price of heating oil, a fuel most commonly used in New England to heat homes, has gone up by 65% since October 2021, according to the Energy Information Administration.

The average price for the oil was $5.46 per gallon in October 2022 compared to $3.30 in October 2021, due to refining constraints and low stockpiles of the fuel, according to a Nov. 17 notice posted by the EIA. Inventories of distillate fuel oil, which is refined to produce diesel and heating oil, are at their lowest levels since 2008, causing the Biden administration to propose forcing fuel vendors to maintain a minimum amount of fuel in their tanks in order to prevent severe shortages.

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Commentary: Don’t Be Fooled by October’s Decrease in the Rate of Inflation

October’s Consumer Price Index, the measure of the national rate of inflation, was at 7.7 percent in October, compared to a reading of 8.2 percent in September. The report propelled “U.S. stocks forward [at the open] and sent Treasury yields tumbling as Wall Street weighed the implication of softer prints on Federal Reserve policy.”

The decline in the rate of inflation was driven by declining annual prices of “necessities” such as smartphones (-22.9 percent), admission to sporting events (-17.7 percent), televisions (-16.5 percent), and women’s outerwear (-1.4 percent), all items that are discretionary purchases.

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California to Face Budget Shortfall Amid Mass Exodus of Business Owners

The state of California is facing a budget deficit of $25 billion going into 2023, the state’s Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) reports.

According to the Daily Caller, the LAO’s Wednesday report claimed that the primary reason for the deficit will be the shortcomings in the state’s tax revenue, which will ultimately be about $41 billion less than originally projected. Corporate tax revenue in the state is expected to drop by about $6 billion from fiscal year 2021-2022 to 2023-2024, and personal income tax revenue has also declined, from $135.9 billion in the prior fiscal year to an estimated $122.6 billion in the coming fiscal year.

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Commentary: Third Time’s a Charm for Merrick Garland

What do you suppose the chances are that Merrick Garland, Joe Biden’s attorney general and chief enforcer, is a student of Søren Kierkegaard? Pretty slim, I’d wager. But his announcement yesterday that he was getting the old band back together and appointing yet another “special counsel” to investigate Donald Trump made me think that he should take a gander at Repetition, a book that Kierkegaard published in 1843 under the pseudonym Constantin Constantius.

The book is an arch, hothouse affair, full of Kierkegaard’s mocking and self-indulgent philosophical curlicues. But the MacGuffin of the book—whether one can really repeat the events of one’s life and, if so, what significance that repetition has—is something Garland might want to ponder for himself. I don’t think I will be spoiling things by revealing that Kierkegaard—or at least his pseudonymous narrator—concludes that, no, “there simply is no repetition” in life. 

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Majority of Hispanic Voters Want Government to Do More to Enforce Immigration Laws, Exit Poll Finds

Hispanic voters say the U.S. government should do more to enforce immigration laws, according to new polling data.  

An exit poll conducted by Rasmussen Reports and NumbersUSA found that more than half of Hispanics who voted in the 2022 midterm elections agree that the government isn’t doing enough to reduce illegal immigration. 

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Commentary: Americans Should Pay Close Attention to the FBI and Zero-Click

During the Trump administration, the FBI paid $5 million to an Israeli software company for a license to use its “zero-click” surveillance software called Pegasus. Zero-click refers to software that can download the contents of a target’s computer or mobile device without the need for tricking the target into clicking on it. The FBI operated the software from a warehouse in New Jersey.

Before revealing any of this to the two congressional intelligence committees to which the FBI reports, it experimented with the software. The experiments apparently consisted of testing Pegasus by spying — illegally and unconstitutionally since no judicially issued search warrant had authorized the use of Pegasus — on unwitting Americans by downloading data from their devices.

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Special Counsel Investigating Trump Was Key Figure in IRS Targeting Scandal

Jack Smith, the special counsel appointed by Attorney General Merrick Garland to investigate former president Donald Trump’s possession of classified information, was a key figure in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)’s infamous targeting of conservative non-profits, according to a 2014 report by Republicans on the House Oversight Committee.

On Oct. 8, 2010, Smith, then-Chief of the DOJ Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section at the time, called a meeting with former IRS official Lois Lerner “to discuss how the IRS could assist in the criminal enforcement of campaign-finance laws against politically active nonprofits,” according to testimony from Richard Pilger, then director of the section’s Election Crimes Branch and subordinate of Smith’s, to the Oversight Committee. Lerner eventually resigned from the IRS in 2015 following criticism of her targeting of conservative groups when denying or delaying tax-exempt status.

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Growing Body of Evidence Disputes Claims That Puberty Blockers Are Safe, Reversible

Puberty blockers are widely touted by doctors and transgender activists as a safe and fully reversible way to pause puberty for children with gender identity issues, but a growing body of evidence is challenging those claims, according to The New York Times.

The drug prevents the surge in bone density that would normally occur during puberty, and patients can see lifelong bone issues that are never resolved, according to the Monday NYT article. Medical professionals are also challenging claims that the drug is reversible, arguing instead that blocking puberty permanently cements a child’s transgender identity and puts them on a path to lifelong biomedical intervention.

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FCC Member: ‘TikTok Is China’s Digital Fentanyl’

Federal Communications Commission member Brendan Carr said that TikTok is “China’s digital fentanyl” and that the social media platform is “a very sophisticated surveillance app.”

“At the end of the day, TikTok is China’s digital fentanyl,” Carr, a Republican and one of five FCC commissioners, said Friday on Fox News.

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Top Conservative Groups, Lawmakers Call for Delay of GOP Leadership Elections

A group of leading conservative research and political activist organizations have called on the House and Senate Republican Conferences to delay leadership elections, challenging the leaderships of Rep. McCarthy and Sen. Mitch McConnell.

The two-paragraph letter has called for the elections to be delayed until after Georgia’s U.S. Senate runoff election, between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and Republican Herschel Walker, on December 6. Former Rep. David McIntosh of Indiana, who heads the Club for Growth and was a signatory to the letter, has said that the elections must be delayed “until we know the outcome of all the elections—specifically the Georgia runoff and the remaining 23 House races,” per a statement on the group’s website.

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Pennsylvania’s Gettysburg College Postpones Art Event for Those ‘Tired of White Cis Men’

A Pennsylvania college has postponed a senior project painting event for students “tired of white cis men” following complaints, the college told the Daily Caller News Foundation.

An event a part of a senior project at Gettysburg College was set to be held for students to paint and write about their tiredness “of white cis men” on November 12, Gettysburg College told the DCNF. The event was postponed following a series of “bias incident reports” made by students who saw flyers promoting the event.

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Commentary: The Systemic Racism of the Teachers Unions

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case that could reverse the 2003 Grutter v. Bollinger decision, in which SCOTUS asserted that the use of an applicant’s race as a factor in an admissions policy of a public educational institution does not violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The current case specifically cites the use of race in the admissions process at Harvard and the University of North Carolina. The plaintiffs, Students for Fair Admissions, maintain that Harvard violates Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, “which bars entities that receive federal funding from discriminating based on race, because Asian American applicants are less likely to be admitted than similarly qualified white, Black, or Hispanic applicants.”

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Commentary: The Real Trump Card in 2024

After a disappointing outcome for the U.S. Congressional midterm elections – Democrats will retain the U.S. Senate  without any net loss of seats, and Republicans poised to retake the U.S. House by a slim majority – political attention is already shifting to the race for 2024 and the White House against President Joe Biden, and to whether former President Donald Trump might run again for the nation’s highest office.

Midterms usually favor the opposition party, with a 90 percent likelihood of picking up seats in the U.S. House from 1906 to 2018, which did happen. The question now is how many seats and if it was definitively enough to win the race. As of this writing, Republicans have 212 seats to Democrats’ 205 seats in races that have been called, and Republicans have leads in nine races not yet called, just barely enough to get a majority.

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NYC to Spend More than Half a Billion Dollars Supporting Illegal Migrants

New York City is expected to spend nearly $600 million to support illegal migrants over the course of one year, according to a report released Sunday by the city’s Independent Budget Office (IBO).

The city is expected to spend close to $580 million on shelter accommodations, public school, health care, legal assistance and other forms of aid, according to the IBO report. Approximately 23,000 illegal migrants have arrived in the Big Apple since April.

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McCarthy May Not Have the Votes to Become Speaker

In the aftermath of the disappointing 2022 midterm election results, conservative Republicans in the House of Representatives have signaled that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) may not have the support he needs to become the next Speaker of the House.

As reported by The Hill, some Republicans have asked that the party’s closed-door leadership election be delayed while the results of the outstanding races come in.

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University of Pennsylvania Environmental Scholar ‘Ashamed’ at School’s Response to Football Game Climate Protest

During the University of Pennsylvania’s homecoming football game against Yale late last month, around 75 climate protesters stormed the field and delayed the start of the second half by about an hour.

Nineteen Fossil Free Penn protesters ended up being detained by campus police, and due to their actions some received notice that their membership in official Penn student groups could be in jeopardy.

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Commentary: The Top 10 U.S. Senate Races to Watch

Americans will soon get to cast their first votes since the science–denying COVID mask and vaccine mandates, the second wave of COVID-related blowout spending and subsequent inflation, and the COVID-related school closures that allowed parents to see what the public schools are really teaching their boys and girls – including that they can choose whether they are boys or girls. With all of these matters implicitly on the ballot, how are things shaping up going into Election Day?

Starting with the House of Representatives, six months ago Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report projected “a GOP gain in the 15-25 seat range.” At the time, I responded, “While things could change over the next six months (although the cake is probably largely baked), a GOP gain of 30 to 40 House seats appears more likely at this stage of the contest than Walter’s projected GOP gain of 15 to 25 seats.”

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Commentary: Biden, Clinton, Obama, and Pelosi Finally Enacted Their Radical Ideology and It Wrecked the Country

Over the last few months the four icons of the Democratic Party – Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and Nancy Pelosi – have hit the campaign trail.

They’ve weighed in on everything from “right-wing violence” and “election denialists” to the now tired “un-American” semi-fascist MAGA voter – and had nothing much to say about inflation, the border, crime, energy, or the Afghanistan debacle. In this, they remind us just how impoverished and calcified is this left-wing pantheon.

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Commentary: American Fitness Has National Security Implications

Fiscal year 2023 is projected to be the most difficult year for military recruiting since the inception of the all-volunteer force in 1973. Every branch of the military is reporting extreme challenges in recruiting enough volunteers to fill their ranks. Not only are fewer people volunteering, but there are fewer eligible Americans to recruit as the prevalence of obesity grows and disqualifies an ever-increasing number from military service.

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New High School Lessons Aim to Teach Students About the ‘Horrors of Communism’

A nonprofit organization launched its digital curriculum Thursday for students to learn the “horrors of communism.”

The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation (VOC) has launched its Communism: A History of Repression, Violence and Victims curriculum featuring 10 sections and 33 chapters of material to help school districts teach the basic theory and ideology behind communism. Fully sourced and peer-reviewed, the curriculum is aimed at high school sophomores and covers the tools and theories of communism, which is lacking in schools, VOC told the Daily Caller News Foundation.

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Doctors Sue Newsom, California Medical Board for Law Regulating COVID-19 Advice

A group of California physicians filed a lawsuit against Gov. Gavin Newsom and the state’s medical board over a new law that will regulate what doctors can tell patients about COVID-19 risks and treatments.

A.B. 2098 will make it “unprofessional conduct” for physicians or surgeons to provide their patients “false information” related to COVID-19, including vaccines, “that is contradicted by “contemporary scientific consensus contrary to the standard of care.” The legislation discriminates against alternative viewpoints and creates “a severe chilling effect,” contradicting the First Amendment, the New Civil Liberties Alliance (NCLA)-backed lawsuit contends.

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Commentary: The U.S. Senate’s ‘Spendthrift Seven’ Are the IRS’ Best Friends

August 7 was a big day for the Spendthrift Seven. In just 12 hours, these Senate Democrats — all facing re-election Tuesday — gave the middle finger to middle-class taxpayers, hugged illegal aliens, and high-fived the IRS.

Arizona’s Mark Kelly, Colorado’s Michael Bennet, Connecticut’s Richard Blumenthal, Georgia’s Raphael Warnock, Nevada’s Catherine Cortez Masto, New Hampshire’s Maggie Hassan and Washington’s Patty Murray did these things while the Senate considered President Joe Biden’s deceptively titled, 273-page Inflation Reduction Act (IRA). Their votes should appall every American.

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Philadelphia Home Depot Employees Overwhelmingly Reject Unionization

Philadelphia Home Depot employees voted overwhelmingly to reject joining what would have been the first store-wide union at the hardware store.

Out of the 266 employees in the Pennsylvania store, workers voted Saturday evening 165 to 51 against being members of Home Depot Workers United, according to the local NPR outlet. This means less than 20% of the stores’ employees voted in support of being in the union.

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Judge Allows Lawsuit Against Pennsylvania School’s Transgender Lessons to Proceed

In Pennsylvania, a federal judge ruled that a lawsuit filed by a group of parents against a school for allegedly teaching transgenderism to first-grade students will be allowed to proceed.

Fox News reports that in her ruling, U.S. District Judge Joy Flowers Conti rejected a motion to have the lawsuit dismissed, determining that the parents in question had a right to allege that, if they are right in their accusations, their constitutional rights have been violated as a result of the school’s lesson.

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Commentary: Daylight Saving Time’s Mixed Results

This weekend, public service announcements will remind us daylight saving time is over. This means you have to set your clocks back an hour later at 2 a.m. on November 6.

This semiannual ritual shifts our rhythms and temporarily makes us groggy at times when we normally feel alert. Moreover, many Americans are confused about why we spring forward in March and fall back in November, and whether it is worth the trouble.

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Biden Voter Registration Effort Targets Vulnerable Americans Likely to Vote Democrat, Memos Show

Congressional investigators have obtained evidence that the Biden administration has launched a sprawling effort to use federally funded job training and food stamp programs to register new voters in Democrat-skewing demographic groups such as young adults and Native Americans, fueling concerns the federal government is placing a partisan thumb on the scales in the midterm elections.

Part of the plan, spurred by a 2021 executive order by President Joe Biden, is captured in an eight-page memo that the Labor Department’s Employment and Training Administration sent out in March to state and local officials responsible for providing training to workers in need of jobs.

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Immigration Records Show Pelosi Attacker in Country Illegally, Officials Say

David DePape, the man accused of attacking House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s husband, entered the United States from Canada 22 years ago and never sought legal status after that, making him an illegal alien in the eyes of the U.S. government, officials told Just the News.

U.S. immigration records show DePape is a Canadian citizen born in 1980 and he last lawfully entered the United States on Aug. 6, 2000, the officials said.

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Government Unions, Progressive Donors Finance Assault on Pennsylvania’s Charter Schools

Liberal groups aligned with the Washington consulting firm Arabella Advisors have spent over $1 million to support attacks on school choice in Pennsylvania, joining public employee unions that have pumped tens of thousands of dollars into targeting charter schools.

An organization called Education Voters of Pennsylvania has published a series of articles and reports critical of the state Legislature’s funding of charter schools in general and so-called cybercharter schools in particular.

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Commentary: Carbon County Could Hold the Key to PA-07

This election is not only an important one but a costly one. It has been crisis after crisis under the Biden administration and Pennsylvanians are paying the price. As the crises continue to grow, Biden has become a drag on Democrats. Democrats like Susan Wild and John Fetterman are detached from Pennsylvanians and the issues that matter to families and business have fallen to the wayside under their leadership.

Gas prices and energy costs are crippling Pennsylvania families. This year as a country, we surpassed the highest recorded average gas price ever and those that heat their homes with oil are facing serious cost increases that are a direct result of the Biden-Democrat agenda.

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Cities Tap $222 Million in Federal COVID-19 Relief for ‘Guaranteed Income’ Programs

Democrats’ American Rescue Plan, sold as helping the nation recover from the economic crisis sparked by COVID-19, provided funds to begin “guaranteed basic income” programs in at least two dozen cities across the country. 

More than $222 million from the legislation has gone to some of America’s largest cities—including Los Angeles; Washington, D.C.; Seattle, New Orleans, and Chicago—for pilot programs that would dole out money to low-income residents, in most cases for one or two years. 

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Democrats Dish Out Millions to Defend House District Strongholds

House Democrats are spending millions more on ads and sending top surrogates to areas of the country where they have traditionally won elections, as Republicans expect to benefit from a “red wave” in November’s midterms, the Washington Post reported Thursday.

House Majority PAC, a Super PAC allied with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, purchased ads in three districts surrounding New York City – New York’s 3rd and 18th Congressional Districts and New Jersey’s 5th Congressional District – which have Cook Partisan Voting Index scores of D+3, D+1 and D+5, respectively. In total, spending on these districts was $6.3 million, per the Washington Post’s examination of Federal Election Commission filings.

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Commentary: Lo, the Era of Pretendians

I think we finally found Elizabeth Warren’s secret grandmother.

It turns out Elizabeth Warren told 1/1024th of the truth when she laid claim to being a Native American back in 2020.

Well, maybe it was 1/64th true – according to the results of the DNA test she took to back up those claims.

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Majority of House Seats Now Lean Republican, Election Forecaster Says

A majority of seats in the House of Representatives now lean Republican, according to a new election forecast from Sabato’s Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia.

Competitive races are breaking heavily in favor of Republicans, and analysts moved four House races in New York, Oregon, California and New Mexico from “toss up” to “leans Republican” from last week’s predictions. The GOP is now slated to win 218 House seats by Sabato’s forecast, taking control of the chamber.

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RNC Launches 73 Election Integrity Lawsuits Across 20 States

In the year 2022 alone, the Republican National Committee (RNC) has filed 73 different lawsuits in 20 different states, alleging various violations of election procedure and resulting in several key victories, with two weeks to go before the midterms.

As reported by Fox News, the lawsuits focus on such matters as the counting of ballots that are either undated or mismarked, as well as the rights of poll watchers to directly observe the counting of ballots. The large-scale legal action by the RNC comes after widespread accusations of voter fraud in the 2020 election cycle, which many believe was enough to swing the results away from President Donald J. Trump and in favor of Democrat Joe Biden.

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Study Shows Marijuana Use Reaching Record Levels Among Young Adults

According to a new study, use of the drug marijuana has reached record highs for young adults in the United States, to the point that it may become a common practice for a majority of this demographic.

Breitbart reports that the study, conducted by scientists at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, on behalf of the organization Monitoring the Future, shows a significant increase in the use of marijuana and other hallucinogens among adults between the ages of 19 and 30, compared to the same rates just 10 years earlier.

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Home Sales Plummet in Ominous Sign for Economy

Sales of existing homes fell in September for the eighth month in a row, as historically high mortgage rates pummel demand for homes, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) announced Thursday.

The 1.5% decline from August contributed to a 23.8% slide compared to September 2021, as the median existing-home sales price rose 8.4% from last September, from $355,100 to $384,800, the NAR reported. NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun said that high mortgage rates were contributing to reduced demand, particularly in “expensive regions of the country.”

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Judge Rules in Favor of California Baker Who Refused to Bake Same-Sex Wedding Cake

In California, a judge ruled in favor of a baker who was sued by the state for refusing to bake a cake for a lesbian couple’s wedding.

The New York Post reports that Cathy Miller, the owner of Tastries Bakery in Bakersfield, was sued by the state’s Department of Fair Housing and Employment after she refused to bake a cake for Eileen and Mireya Rodridguez-Del Rio. The state accused Miller of violating the Unruh Civil Rights Act, a state anti-discrimination law.

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England Moves to Restrict Transgender Procedures for Kids as Biden Doubles Down

England’s National Health Service (NHS) banned puberty blockers for minors outside strict clinical trials and advised against social transitions for kids, arguing that most children who think they’re transgender are going through a phase they will outgrow, according to The Telegraph.

The NHS is developing plans to restrict cross-sex medical treatments for children due to “scarce and inconclusive evidence to support clinical decision-making,” according to The Telegraph. As England moves to limit transgender medical interventions for children, the Biden administration has been championing child sex changes and publicly criticizing state level efforts to restrict those procedures as harmful to transgender people.

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Poll: Oz Draws Even with Fetterman Just Weeks Before Midterms

Democratic Lt. Gov. John Fetterman and Republican Dr. Mehmet Oz are statistically tied in a new survey of Pennsylvania voters, five days before they hold their first and only debate of the Pennsylvania Senate race and less than three weeks before voting begins, per a survey released on Thursday.

Fetterman and Oz gained 46.3% and 45.5%, respectively, of the support of respondents, according to a poll conducted by Insider  for FOX29, Philadelphia’s Fox affiliate. Around 5% of voters remained undecided, according to the poll.

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Biden Throws Support Behind Universal, Federally Funded Abortion Leave

President Joe Biden expressed support for federally-funded leave and childcare services for women seeking abortions in a NowThis video airing Sunday, according to Axios.

Biden told NowThis he supports paying women who undergo abortions for childcare and travel expenses, according to Axios. A reporter had asked him whether he supported a federally-funded version of the efforts private companies are taking to financially support women who want abortions.

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Coast Guard Illegally Denied Hundreds of Vaccine Exemptions, Attorneys Say

The U.S. Coast Guard’s alleged use of an automated system to deny religious waivers to as many as 1,231 servicemembers would be in violation of the law, attorneys told the Daily Caller News Foundation on Wednesday.

Leaders from each of the military branches, including the Coast Guard, are required to individually review vaccine exemption requests, legal experts who have worked on military vaccine exemption cases told the DCNF. An investigation by members of the House Oversight Committee found that the Coast Guard used a computer-based tool defaulted to issue mass denials of religious accommodations, Fox News first reported Tuesday, a practice that is in “clear” violation of federal law, attorneys said.

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White House Refuses to Address Arrests of Pro-Lifers amid Attacks on Pregnancy Resource Centers

President Joe Biden’s administration is refusing to address why it’s focusing efforts on arresting pro-life activists amid national outcry over dozens of attacks on pro-life centers and churches.

At least 86 Catholic churches and 74 pregnancy resource centers and pro-life organizations have been attacked since the May leak of the draft Supreme Court opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, according to a Catholic Vote tracker. Many of these buildings have been vandalized with threats such as “If abortions aren’t safe, neither are you.”

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House GOP Set to Investigate PayPal for Its Plan to Fine Users for ‘Misinformation’

House Republicans are likely to launch an investigation of PayPal for a now-retracted policy that would fine users up to $2,500 for spreading “misinformation” or posting content that it deemed “objectionable,” per a letter sent to PayPal Tuesday.

The letter demanded that PayPal send House Republicans on the Energy and Commerce Committee and Financial Services Committee written answers to 15 questions about the circumstances surrounding the “Acceptable Use Policy,” which was published by PayPal on Oct. 8. The questions demand PayPal to name those who drafted the policy, who had the authority to approve it, and whether PayPal had coordinated with the Biden administration regarding it.

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Commentary: The Central Importance of Infrastructure

After I’d chastised him repeatedly for being the spoiler in the November 2020 battle between Republican David Perdue and Democrat Jon Ossoff to represent Georgia in the U.S. Senate, Shane Hazel invited me to debate him on his podcast.

During our lengthy discussion, Hazel demonstrated a thorough knowledge of the U.S. Constitution, and we found ourselves in agreement on many if not most of the critical issues, starting with the First and Second Amendments. One topic I wish we could have spent more time discussing was the issue of infrastructure. As it was, I got nowhere with Hazel on that question.

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Major Newspaper Publishes ‘Misleading’ Photos on First Trimester Abortion

The Guardian published images of gestational tissue from the first 9 weeks of pregnancy without clarifying that the embryo had been removed, giving the impression that no embryo was present, an OB-GYN told the Daily Caller News Foundation.

The article showed eight photos of the gestational sac — a thin, white tissue that supports a pregnancy — and suggested first trimester abortions only removed this tissue in a Wednesday article titled “What a pregnancy actually looks like before 10 weeks – in pictures.” The embryos had been removed from the tissue, according to OB-GYN Christina Francis, but the article made no mention of that.

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